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Citations and Bibliographies: MLA Style

MLA Handbook

Examples for Works Cited Pages

Source Type General Format Works Cited Page: Example In-Text Citation: Example
Article from a database
Author last name, First name. "Article Title." Journal Title, vol. #, no. #, Year, pp. ##-##. Database name, URL or DOI [do not include http://]. Accessed Day Month Year.
DeLaet, Debra L., and Rachel Paine Caufield. “Gay Marriage as a Religious Right: Reframing the Legal Debate over Gay Marriage in the United States.” Polity vol. 40, no. 3, 2008: 297–320. JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/40213478. Accessed 10 Dec. 2019.
(DeLaet and Paine 301)
Article in a scholarly journal in print
Author last name, first name. "Article Title." Journal Title, vol. #, no. #, Year, pp. ##-##.
Hasan, Rafia. “The Role of Woman as Agents of Change and Development in Pakistan.” Human Rights Quarterly, vol. 3, no. 3, 1981, pp. 68–75.
(Hasan 73)
Article in an online magazine or newspaper
Author last name, first name. "Article Title." Magazine/Newspaper Title, Day Month Year, URL or DOI [do not include http://]. Accessed Day Month Year.
Rich, Nathaniel. “Can a Jellyfish Unlock the Secret of Immortality?” The New York Times Magazine, 28 Nov. 2012, nyti.ms/2k5aSuU. Accessed 10 Dec. 2019.
(Rich)
Book   
Author last name, first name. Book Title. City of Publication,* Publisher, Year.
*Note: the city of publication should be included only if the book was published before 1900, if it was published in a specific location by a publisher that has offices in more than one city, or if the publisher is unknown in North America.
Stein, Laura Lynn. Speech Rights in America: The First Amendment, Democracy, and the Media. University of Illinois Press, 2006.
(Stein 221)
Review
Review author last name, first name. "Title of Review (if there is one)." Review of Book/Performance Title, by Author/Director. Periodical Title, vol. #, no. #, year OR Day Month Year of Publication, pp. #-#.
Tanner, David E. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.” Review of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, by Rebecca Skloot. Journal of Popular Culture vol. 43, no. 4, 2010, pp. 916–918.
(Tanner 916)
Article or chapter in an edited book or anthology
Article/chapter author last name, first name.  "Selection Title." Book Title, edited by Editor Name.  Publisher, Year, pp. ###-###.
Hayes, Danny. "Parties and the Media: Getting Messages to Voters."  New Directions in American Political Parties, edited by Jeffrey M. Stonecash. Routledge, 2010, pp. 44-62.
(Hayes 48)
A page on a website
Author last name, first name (if available). "Page title [usually found in the page header]." Website Title, URL or DOI [do not include http://]. Accessed Day Month Year.
Sartore, Joel. "Common Octopus." National Geographic, www.nationalgeographic.com/animals/invertebrates/c/common-octopus. Accessed 10 Dec. 2019.
(Sartore, "Common Octopus")
Entire website
Website author or compiler (if available). Website name, URL or DOI [do not include http://]. Accessed Day Month Year.
Leip, David. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections, uselectionatlas.org. Accessed 10 Dec. 2019.
(Dave Leip's Atlas)

In-Text Citations

MLA in-text citations are made by incorporating information about the source into the text, followed by a parenthetical reference with specific pages cited or any additional information needed.

For full style rules and formatting, see the MLA handbook for writers of research papers, which is available at the Service desk for in-library use. 

Basic examples:

  • In Running for My Life, Lomong describes the difficulties of beginning school at tenth grade in upstate New York (110). [Here, author and work are evident in sentence so parenthetical includes page number only.]
  • In the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, the U.S. government stopped the resettlement program that brought Sudanese "Lost Boys" to the United States (Lomong 119). [Here, author is not evident from the sentence, so parenthetical includes both the author name and the page number.]